and the sexual exploitation of children, including child pornography

Operational activities, such as pursuing and prosecuting criminals, remain the responsibility of EU States. The Commission’s objective is to assist EU States in fighting organised crime more effectively


Modern forms of slavery
Trafficking in human beings for whatever purpose – sexual or labour exploitation – and the sexual exploitation of children, including child pornography, are despicable crimes affecting the most vulnerable citizens. Preventing and fighting them is a top EU priority. Therefore, the Commission has proposed new rules for tougher action against criminals responsible for child sexual abuse and trafficking, as well as better assistance for victims.
The reality of cybercrime
Large-scale attacks against information systems and various other forms of cybercrime, such as online identity theft or on-line child abuse, are subject to rapidly evolving technological developments. The EU’s responses to such crimes are equally innovative and flexible, ranging from support for cross-border cyber-investigations and training of police to legislative measures.
Going after criminals’ money

Modern financial turmoil highlights the prominence of financial crime, including tax fraud, identity theft, money laundering and outright corruption. The ratification of the United Nations’ Convention against Corruption has been a further step towards a more coherent EU anti-corruption policy. Nevertheless, more needs to be done to ensure effective cooperation between EU States’ authorities, in particular on preventing crime by effectively freezing, confiscating and recovering proceeds of crime. Our action also entails promoting EU-wide standards on financial investigations, which includes making more frequent use of joint investigation teams.